How many sides?

Inspired by the robots demonstration last week where we saw a robot draw a triangle using a Scratch program we thought we’d have a go at the code.

What if we were to interact with a shape-drawing-robot and tell it what to draw by answering the simple question “How many sides?”

We didn’t get a chance to finish it off so I’ve copied my version onto the Scratch site.

http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/10943044/

Sprites – are you ready for a new challenge?

We going to build a naughts and crosses game over a couple of weeks with the computer as a player! This week we’ll create a sprite which changes to X or O depending on who’s turn it is. Then next we’ll build the 3×3 grid that two humans can play. Next, we will have the computer determine if there is a winner and with any luck we will introduce our first simple computer player.

For the next couple of weeks we’ll have a go at building a naughts and crosses game with the computer as a player!  This week we’ll create a sprite which changes to X or O depending on who’s turn it is.  Then next we’ll build the 3×3 grid that two humans can play.  Next, we will have the computer determine if there is a winner and with any luck we will introduce our first simple computer player.

There are as usual loads of examples on the Scratch site if you want a sneak peak http://scratch.mit.edu/tags/view/tic-tac-toe.

What is Scratch?

Scratch is a programming language that makes it easy to create your own interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art — and share your creations on the web.

As young people create and share Scratch projects, they learn important mathematical and computational ideas, while also learning to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively.

Download Scratch for free from http://info.scratch.mit.edu/.